5 Important Questions

5 Important Questions

 

We have all had a friend or family member that wanted us to buy something from them. Makeup, clothes, furniture, and the list goes on. I personally love shopping local and love supporting my friends and family but what about that age old saying “don’t mix business with pleasure”?

After years of serving people, I’ve come up with a way to find out if working with someone will be a good fit, regardless of if they are a friend of family member. The first step is to visualize that person, then ask yourself…

 

Is this person an expert in their field?

Malcolm Gladwell discussed becoming an expert in his best-selling book, “Outliers”. He proposes that it takes about 10,000 hours of deliberate practice to become an expert at any given topic. That’s about 10 years. So it takes about 10 years of intentional, mindful studying and practice to finally be able to claim expert status. Look at any given field. Electrical, beautician, auto mechanic, clothing designer, ect. When considering an investment opportunity, I’m forced to ask myself “has this person done the work and put in the time to become an expert?”

Is this person trustworthy with personal information?

If someone gossips to me, then the chances are high that they are gossiping about me to someone else. Sharing stories to communicate a point can be done in a way that doesn’t violate someone’s trust. When I consider working with someone, I always take into consideration how they speak of past client relationships. I have decided that I only partner with people who are transparent and honest enough to give it to me straight, but not too boisterous or open mouthed about personal information… especially about an investment or big decision. A real estate agent should ONLY be speaking with you and their designated broker about your transactions. Period. No excuses.

Can I ask questions without being made to feel stupid?

Every profession has inside language. Heck, every FAMILY has inside language! If someone is specialized in a field, they should feel secure enough to explain it to me in a way I can understand. If they aren’t willing inform me or take the time to answer my questions, I probably don’t want to work with them. Especially if it’s a financial investment! A sure-fire sign of expert status is that they can clearly lay out the stages or process to their profession without inside language or jargon.

Can I accept constructive criticism from this person?

This goes hand in hand with being able to ask questions. If I am going to trust someone with my time and money, and they have the heart of a teach and want to help me, there are bound to be things that come up where I just don’t know what is best… typically it’s because I don’t do it full time! So if my electrician is able to explain the rationale behind a process, I’ll probably trust their experience enough and go with their opinion. This is only after I am secure that they have my best interest in mind, not their bank account.

Is this person level-headed in difficult situations?

Financial purchases can turn emotional real quick! I have found that a big portion of my job is to help keep people grounded and focus on the facts at hand. If someone folds under pressure
over small matters, it’s safe to presume they will fold under big matters too. Making sure you have a level-headed viewpoint is so important when it comes to negotiating repairs and closing terms. You need someone who can help find solutions.

If your answer was no to any of these questions, then it sounds like you probably need to have a conversation with this friend of family member. If it’s not a good fit, that is okay! Explaining to them ahead of time that you are concerned about the relationship being at risk is a totally valid. Any friend worth their weight will understand and may even have the same thoughts.

On the other hand, if you were able to say Yes about the person you were visualizing, then it is probably fine to work with them! Personally, I have found that friends and family members tend to do a BETTER job and care more about protecting me than someone that I don’t have a connection with.

Get the 7 secrets to a stress free transaction here! 

5 Things To Avoid When Selling

5 Things NOT To Do When Selling

 

Put your bright yellow buyers cap on with me and imagine you’re searching for a new home. A place you can be comfortable inviting your friends over for a birthday party, or hosting the next family holiday event. You’re scrolling through the different properties online and decide to go see a few in person... now ask yourself, what differentiates the properties to you? What helps you filter the properties you just want to see online and which you are compelled to see in person?

After decades of witnessing just about every listing faux pas, misstep, and bad marketing strategy out there, I’ve compiled the top 5 things to avoid when selling your property. Let’s get your listing from one they just want to see online, to one they are compelled to see in person!

1. Waiting to market

In today’s modern social media world, there are plenty of ways to create intrigue before your house actually goes live on the MLS. 25% of houses are sold to friends or family members of the neighbors so the next time you see one of your neighbors strike up a conversation with them about possibly selling.

2. Remove dead plants & cover with leaves

A lot of plants, such as hosta's and bulb flowers, will die back in the winter. If you want these beautiful plants to return better than when you planted them, cut back the dying part cover them with a thin layer of leaves. Adding to much could cause rot, so I like to gather the fallen leaves from our neighborhood and tuck my plants in for the winter. This will protect them from the frost.

3. Winterize lawn with a slow release fertilizer

Cut your lawn for the last time until next spring and lay some slow release fertilizer. This will feed the grass throughout the winter and make it ready to start growing strong again first thing in the spring.

4. Make your spring project checklist

Have you ever woken up in late march and felt frantic to get your spring projects started? Planning ahead with a checklist can really help you stay focused on the priorities. I hang mine up on the frig so we can start the spring season off right and budget appropriately. Note: Late fall/early winter is the best time to plant some bulbs! I always plant tulips, garlic, onions, and daffodils. Perfect for an early spring harvest!

5. Service your furnace

Propane and natural gas furnaces are the most common source of heat in the United States. If maintained properly, they can last 15-20 years... sometimes even longer! Serving your furnace every year will help the efficiency, and it only takes about 30-45 minutes.

With one big Holiday down, and one more today go, I suggest taking a few moments to reflect on what your property needs. None of these are difficult or expensive task’s but they will help you be ahead of the game and prepare you for a beautiful spring.

Click here to Download your winter checklist

Check out Watsons.com to find more information on Fall Planting Tips

 

All the best!

253-632-2920